Coach Info/ Soccer Rules/ Drills

 

Soccer Coaching Info

 

 

  1. Responsibilities:
  • For some kids, this might be their only experience with learning how to play soccer. Ultimate goal- learn the basics and have fun! Good sportsmanship is key!

 

  1. Equipment:
  • Cones– We’ll set up the fields for tomorrow and then you can take home the cones to have for your practices. You’ll only need cones for the 1st 2 Sat. practices and the other 4 practices that you do throughout the season. We’ll spray the field lines for the games. (Sidenote- if your team votes on not having the additional 4 practices, that’s fine! We just wanted to encourage the extra playing time together as a team. Sometimes after the 1st 2 Sat. practices, you might feel like more practices would be helpful for your team. So, you can vote on that as a team or make the executive decision as the coach.)
  • 1 game ball that stays at each field.
  • I’d encourage to get a ball for your other practices and a whistle. It’s good to practice using the whistle with the kids, so they know when to stop during the game.

 

 

  1. Basics: Please, teach them these basics! (It’s fun for the kids to learn these other skills to add variety to the basic “kicking” and “shooting at the goal” skills.)
  • Throw-ins– this is where they plant both feet with one slightly in front of the other at a diagonal and throw the ball over their head. (This is done when the ball goes out of bounds by the other team.)

 

  • Kick off– at the beginning of the game in the middle of the field. Place ball in the middle with one player from one of the teams to kick off. This is also done when someone scores a goal. The opposing team that didn’t score the goal gets to kick off.

 

  • Positions- (Ages 3-5)- Don’t worry about positions. I just literally line them up in the middle of the field. (Ages 6-12)- I have them play with 2 defenders that are back by the goal and 2 forwards that are in the middle of the field. The forwards can go anywhere on the field. Then, the 5th player is the Goalie.

 

  • Penalty kick– Teach the kids not to touch the ball with their hands. this is when the other team touches the ball with their hands, so someone gets to take a goal kick on the opposing team’s goal. Place ball 4-8 feet in front of the goal, depending on the age group. The goalie can protect the goal.

 

  • Pass– cushion the ball with the inside/ outside of the foot to slow the ball down, then kick to another player.

 

  • Goal kick– this is when the ball goes out of play by the goal. The “red” team goalie kicks the ball back into play when the ball was kicked out by the “blue” team.

 

  • Corner kick– If kicked out of play by the “red” team, then the “blue” team gets to take a corner kick from the corner by the goal.

 

  1. Soccer Rules:

 

  • Ages 3:
    • Each player will get to play!
    • They will play 3 on 3 and rotate new players in every 5 min.
    • Practice time is 1 hour. Game time is 45 min. w/ a small half time at the 20 min. mark.
    • The goals will be open the first 2 games, so the kids can practice scoring, then we’ll add a “Goalie” the 3rd
    • End of game- line up and give high fives to the other team.
    • There won’t be a “Kick off”. The players will just line up in a straight line in the middle of the field and the ref will put the ball in the middle, then blow whistle.
    • We won’t keep score.
    • The coach will be the ref to get the game started and help the kids line up on the field. The assistant will help on the side-lines with the kids rotating in/ out.

 

  • Ages 4-7 (4 on 4), Ages 8-12 (5 on 5):
    • Each player will get to play!
    • They will play 4 on 4 and rotate new players in every 5- 10 min.
    • Practice & Game time is 1 hour w/ a half time @ the 30 min. mark.
    • (AGES 4-7)  The goals will be open the first 2 games, so the kids can practice scoring, then we’ll add a “Goalie” the 3rd game.  (AGES 8-12)  There will be a goalie.
    • End of game- line up and give high fives to the other team.
    • Positions- (Ages 6-12) The players will learn positions, so 2 forwards and 2 defenders & the oldest group 10-12 can add 1 mid-fielder.
    • We will keep score, but encourage the parents and kids to show good sportsmanship!
    • The coach will be the ref to get the game started and help the kids line up on the field. The assistant will help on the side-lines with the kids rotating in/ out.

 

 

SAMPLE PRACTICE:  3-5’s- week 1 Practice

 

  • Welcome: Name Tags/ Introduce yourself to the kids!

 

  • Gather– Have kids kick ball around the perimeter of the field, practice goal shots, or find a partner to pass to ‘til all kids arrive (5 mins)

 

  • Run- from one side of the field to the other and back

 

  • Stretch– circle up & do jumping jacks and other stretches (5 mins)

 

  • Drills- (Have them get their ball! I know they’re ready when they come back & put their foot on their ball. This is “Ready Position”. When I blow my whistle, teach them that’s when they freeze & put their foot on their ball- “Ready Position”. )

 

  1. (Goal Scoring) Divide into 2 groups. 1st group goes to the middle of the field facing one goal and the 2nd group goes to the middle of the field facing the other goal. SHOW THEM- how to dribble the ball, then score a goal. HAVE THEM DO IT NOW- Have them kick a goal, then get their ball, and go to the back of the line. (1 goal= 1 point) Start timer- see how many points they can score in 10 mins. (10 mins)

 

  • Water Break (3 mins)
  1. (Ball throw-in)– Have the 2 groups line up on opposite sides of the field on the sideline and throw it down the side-line towards the goal. SHOW THEM- The proper way is to keep both feet on the ground, while throwing the ball over their head. (Google it if you need a video demonstration). The groups will be on opposite sides of the field by each goal, so they won’t be throwing at each other.

 

         HAVE THEM DO IT NOW- After they throw their ball, have them get their ball & go to the end of the line. When everyone’s done it twice, then line them all up on one side of the field and when you say, “On your mark, get set, Go!” they’ll all practice doing a “throw-in” as far as they can throw it! Let them see how far they can throw it, get their ball, and get back to line quickly! If you start to say “On your mark…” they’ll know they need to hurry back to get ready to throw it again. (10 mins)

 

  1. (Dribbling) Have them line up on one side of the field and kick their ball to the other side and back. Wait for everyone to get to the other side, then have them go back the other way (10 mins).

 

  • Water Break (3 mins)
  1. Scrimmage- Line them up on the field. You can either line up in the middle of the field in a straight line across the field OR put them in their positions. 2 forwards & 1 defender. (Ages 3-5) 2 forwards & 2 defenders by the goal (Ages 6-7) Put the ball in the middle and blow the whistle for the start of the game. Teach them which goal is theirs to score into. (10 mins).

 

  1. Cheer- Blow whistle & yell, “Bring it in!” Have them circle up, put hands in, say, “1, 2, 3- SOCCER!” or have them yell their team name (ie- Coyotes and have them sound like a Coyote- 1, 2, 3- Ow ow awooo!). On the 2nd practice, they’ll get their t-shirts & this is a great time to come up with a team name!

 

**Modify for older age groups: Ages 8-13

**Practice #2 & #3- do the same outline, just different drills!

 

 

 

Other Games & Drills

 

  • 2 Cones (Dribbling)– 2 Line Relay. Have them start @ the 1st cone, then kick their ball down to the 2nd cone, around it, & back. Then next person goes until everyone has gone twice. Players sit down when they’ve gone twice. (Practice- Stopping ball and turning it around the cone.) Cones- 8-10 steps apart.

 

  • Square game (Dribbling)- game to see how many times you can get to the other side and back. When you cross each end- line of cones, it’s 1 point. Do it til you get to 10 points.

 

  • Red Light- Green Light (Ball Control)– Green light means they can dribble the soccer ball. Red light, then blow whistle- means stop with foot on top of ball. This allows them to learn to dribble,      stop the ball,      and control it.

 

  • Sharks and minnows– In the field area, have 2 people be sharks and the rest are minnows. The minnows get to dribble the ball, while the shark tries to kick their ball out of the square. When their ball is kicked out of the square, they bring the ball to the coach & turn into a shark also. Game is over when all of the sharks have kicked out the last minnow’s ball. The kids love this! Then, I pick 2 new sharks.
  • Lions and Tigers- (Attackers/ Defense) Divide group, so that ½ of the group gets a ball & the other ½ doesn’t. The goal is to try to take another person’s ball away from them & dribble it w/o getting it taken away. The Lions (Defenders) are trying to steal the ball and the Tigers (Attackers) are trying to keep their ball. After 1 minute, the player with the ball wins. Repeat 2 or 3 times. (It’s kind of like 1 v. 1 keepaway!)

 

  • Passing– (Demonstrate, then have them practice)
  1. Inside of foot (between the heel and ball of foot)- proper pass technique
  2. Outside of foot- proper pass technique
  3. Shooting the ball- kick with the laces of the cleats/ tennis shoes
  4. Scooping the ball into the air- get foot under the ball w/ the inside of the foot                            closest to the big toe.
  • All the body parts used in soccer:

 

  1. Heading the ball- ball hits at the hairline, not on the top of the head or the main                            part of the forehead.
  2. Chest trap- poke out chest and stomach and let ball hit chest, then fall straight                                     down to feet to be able to continue dribbling the ball.
  3. Cherry bombing the ball- practice holding the ball out & touch to the top of the                                     cleat,          then have them practice kicking the ball out of their hand as it sits on                                     the top of their cleat. Then have them throw the ball up a little bit above                                     their cleat and practice kicking the ball as it comes down.
  4. Trapping the ball- turn foot sideways and cushion the ball with the inside of                                     foot, so it slows and is left in front of you so you can step forward to pass it.

 

  • Partner pass– After you’ve taught proper passing techniques, have them trap the ball, then pass & see how many times they can pass it to their partner in 1 minute. **A PASS IS NO GOOD IF IT CAN’T BE RECEIVED BY THEIR TEAM- MATE. (Good pass is on the ground, within reach, not too hard, not too soft, when it is expected (not to someone not paying attention), pass in front of the player, not in back of them).

 

Now, get in a line & have the partners run as they’re passing down the field ‘til they get                   close to the goal, then shoot. Start the next partnership as soon as the 1st partners score                   their goal.

 

  • Keep away– 3 v. 3. 3 players on offense & 3 on defense. This helps them practice getting        “open” to receive the ball. The team that has the ball after 1 minute wins.

 

  • 1 v. 1 Goal Shooting– Use two pairs. Have one pair serve as “goals” standing with their legs spread apart and the other two are the “players” competing to score. Tell them the      goals must be scored by shooting on the ground in- between the other 2 people’s legs.      Each time it goes through, it’s a point! After one minute goals and players switch.

 

  • 2 passers and 1 defender. Passers pass to each other and defender tries to steal the ball. Take the ball down and shoot. If defender gets it- they get 1 pt. If passers keep it and      score- they get 1 pt.

 

  • Driving school– Use the inside of the field.
•   “This is Driving School & I’m your Instructor. I’m going to teach you how to drive but you must listen carefully & do exactly what I say.”•   Each player has a ball & must stay inside the cones.•   Coach uses a ball to demonstrate what each of the instructions means:”Go” – Start dribbling (“Keep the ball near your feet & look up while you dribble so you don’t run into someone”).

 

“Stop” – Put foot on top of ball to stop it

 

“Slow” – Dribble slow

 

“Speed Up” – Dribble faster but keep looking up & don’t “wreck”.

 

“Turn right” – Use the outside of the right foot to push the ball to the right & dribble

in that direction.

 

“Turn left” – Use the outside of the left foot to push the ball to the left & then dribble

in that direction.

 

“Pull back & go the other way” – Use the bottom of foot to pull the ball back

(i.e., flick it backward) & then turn around & go the other way.

 

For U-10 & up, include “Steparound” when the ball is stopped or going slow. Step over the

ball to the right and then kick with the outside of your left foot out to the left.

 

 

  • Shoulder Charge- Shoulder Tackle”, “Shielding”, “Strength on the Ball” (Ages 8 & up)

 

This Practice Game teaches bravery and aggressive play, that soccer is a physical game and to not be afraid of contact or being bumped or pushed, strength on the ball to maintain possession while dribbling, shielding the ball to maintain possession when challenged, a legal Shoulder Tackle, challenging for the ball to slow the attack and how to legally push a player off the ball. Soccer is a physical game and in real soccer games, it is critical for players to be able to challenge for the ball and also to be able to retain possession of the ball when they are dribbling. The opposing players will try to use a “Shoulder Tackle” to push your players off the ball when they are dribbling, so they can steal the ball or slow down your attack. Your players need to learn what is called “Strength on the Ball” so they aren’t easily pushed off the ball when dribbling. Young players often aren’t used to physical play, but the fact is that the more physical team will usually win, so you must teach your players how to be physical so they have a chance to be successful. At the very least, you don’t want them to fall apart and give up when their opponents are physical and aggressive. This game teaches defenders how to legally use their shoulder to push an opponent off the ball, which is called a “Shoulder Tackle” (and also called a “Shoulder Charge”) and it also teaches players how to avoid being pushed off the ball while dribbling (which is called “Strength on the Ball”). It will get your players used to contact, which is very important, and teach them to play more aggressively. Soccer is a physical game and by U8 the more physical teams will start to have an advantage. Most parents prefer the word “brave” to “aggressive”, so it might be better to talk about teaching players to be “brave”. If your players aren’t prepared and get pushed off the ball, they will get frustrated. This game teaches players how to shield the ball and to have “strength on the ball” so they can retain possession, and how to legally try to steal the ball from the opposing player who has the ball. As you can see from the Testimonials, it really works. I get lots of letters from coaches about how valuable this game is.

 

  1. Have partners put shoulder to shoulder, hip to hipSee which players can make the other one move. Tell them to keep their arms straight down by their side (they cannot raise their arm or push with it, just the shoulder). Also, they must stay straight up and cannot “dip” their shoulder (if they do, they will often be called for a foul). They can move their feet, bend their legs and use their hip so long as their shoulder is in contact with the opponent’s shoulder. (Read Shoulder Charge” in the Dictionary for more rules). Tell your players “You can’t let other players push you around”.

 

  1. Have the pairs walk toward the Finish Line (without a ball), pushing shoulder-to-shoulder, hip-to-hip. If some pairs don’t push, switch up the pairs. Encourage players and praise improvement. For some players physical play is not natural, but with praise & encouragement they will improve. Tell them to keep their feet apart and knees bent so they are difficult to push.

 

  1. Do the same thing while running

 

  1. Give one player in each pair a ball, line up all pairs on the Starting Line and have the players with the ball try to dribble to the Finish Line while the other player tries to kick the ball away or steal it. If the “off-the-ball” player touches the ball he gets one point; if he steals it he gets 2 points. Then, give the other players the ball and let them try to dribble from the Finish Line to the Starting line. Do this several times and switch up the pairs for variety.

 

 

 

**SoccerHelp.com!**

file:///Users/dnsglenn/Desktop/Soccer%202013/Soccer%20Drills%20-%20SoccerHelp.com.webarchive

 

 

Soccer games and drills for Ages 3- 5:

I have had a request about what to do with kindergarten kids. Here are things I’ve done that seem to work.

Rule 1: be nice and have fun.
Rule 2: if things aren’t working give it a minute then move on.
Rule 3: if more than one kid loses focus, change the activity!

Dribbling

Every player with a ball.

Rules

  • Every player must keep moving and not run into anyone else
  • When coach says “one” they must stop and put their right foot on the ball (never mind that most cannot yet tell right from left just tell the lefties to use their other right foot).

Ask what part of your foot you should use when dribbling, get lots of answers. Correct one is all parts (trick question). Show how to pull ball back with sole of foot. Ask them to try it after you say start. When they are dribbling around, say “ONE”; once they are all stopped, tell them that now when you say “TWO” they are to stop and sit on the ball. “START” , “TWO”, Now show some other dribbling technique, for instance cutting the ball across with the inside of the foot. “START”, “ONE”, Tell them to move faster and to keep their heads up. “START”, “TWO”. If they did go faster, they probably had some collisions. Ask them how to avoid them. (Right answer is just like cars on motorway, go slower in traffic, only speed up when no one is around and always pay attention to what the other drivers are doing.)

Tell them when you say “THREE” to stop and put their nose on the ball. “START”, “THREE”, “START”, encourage them to find space on the field, help them say “there’s space over here”, “now its over in the other corner”. etc. Do several of the stops and starts to get them a little silly and maybe introduce another dribbling move.

Try “FOUR” – elbow, “FIVE” -left ear, etc.

Sharks and minnows

Need a moderate space with boundaries (about the dimensions of one long kick for these guys). All but one player (the shark) has a ball. The shark tries to kick the minnows’ balls out of the area. First let the minnows retrieve their ball and continue, then the minnows become sharks after they lose their ball. Continue play until all the balls are gone. Retrieve the balls and repeat.

Use a few cones to make a 10 to 15 yard square. Have all players with ball inside area. Tell them to try and kick each other’s ball out, but to keep their ball in. If their ball is kicked out, they must sprint after it and bring it back inside as quickly as possible. Stop them, ask them to count how many times they can kick someone else’s ball out. Start up again. Stop and ask who had more than 2,4,…. Now ask them to count how many times their ball is kicked out. Start and stop again, forget to ask for total.

Another game is to give 1/2 the players balls and tell the others to take a ball away and try to keep it. Players with a ball after 1 minute win. Repeat 2 or 3 times.

Arrange them in pairs. If you have an odd number, have one play with you. Play 1v1 keepaway for 1 minute. Player in possession after 1 minute is winner. Rearrange the pairs and go again for a total of 3 or 4 times.

Passing

Have them find a partner, one ball per pair. This will take a little while so you might tell them to come back from the break with a partner and a ball before you dismiss them.

First have them pass the ball back and forth while standing about 3 yards apart. They will look hopeless.

Stop them and ask what part of foot to use for short accurate passes on the ground. (Answer is inside of foot, show them what you mean; that part of the foot between the heel and ball of foot.) Have them resume. Point out that a pass is no good if it can’t be received by their team-mate. Ask what that means (answers on ground, within reach, not to hard, not too soft, when it is expected, for example it does no good to pass to a team-mate’s back, or to one picking dandelions)

Stop them ask them how to receive the ball (answer: cushion the ball so it slows and is left in front of you so you can step forward to pass it, Don’t let them stop the ball under their foot, or so close that the ball is stuck between their feet and must be moved before it can be kicked, tell them the ball should be kept moving) Now you will also have to tell them to back up after they pass the ball or else, they will end up too close together. Resume

Stop and tell them to do two-touch passing (you probably will have to ask what Two-touch is and find a correct respondent). Resume

Stop. Tell them that you want to count the number of passes in a minute and to start on your command. Start and time for one minute. Ask each pair how many passes, repeat.

Tell them to do one-touch passing. Time them for one minute while they count. Offer praise, “that’s very good”, That’s better than I though a bunch of 6-year -olds would do”, etc.

Now tell them to pass and move after they pass. Tell them to keep track of their partner, to avoid the other players (It’s harder than it looks), and not to dribble (two- or three -touch).

If you have an even number break them up into equal groups. 2v2 or 3 v3 is good, but 4v4 is confusing and will need a good neutral player or two to work, if you have an odd number pair yourself, or an older sibling with the obviously weakest player.

If you do pairs, have them play keep-away for one minute.

Encourage the player without the ball to move to get open and the defenders to challenge for the ball and to deny passing lanes. Team with the ball after one minute wins. Go again. Go again. Keep reinforcing the idea of getting open on the attack (in a position where your team-mate with the ball can see you, where you are not too close, but close enough and where the other team can’t intercept the pass).

If you do 3v3, consider using a neutral player to help the team with the ball. Again, reinforce the need to move to get open. Point out what happens if you hold the ball too long before passing (you get ganged-up on). Keep such observations very brief and generally make them in the form of a question (to which you will likely get lots of wrong answers, just say “no, that’s not what I’m looking for” or “that’s it!” when you get the right answer) If the neutral player is reasonably talented, have them ask the players to get open whenever there is no good target. The neutral player needs to move to be a good receiving position all the time. The better the neutral player, the more players that can be involved. Tell the players with the ball to make the longest pass they are capable of to a team-mate who is open. (Not the longest kick, but the longest pass to the team-mate farthest away from the other team’s players; Same comments about passes as before, within reach, on ground, not too hard, not too soft).

Shooting

Players love to shoot and score. Almost anything that gets lots of shots in a short time is fine. With 6 or fewer, a simple line taking turns and retrieving the balls works fine. Have them stay out of the way of each others shots.

For more than 6, you need to keep the bystanders occupied in some way. Having them serve a ball to the shooter, then move to the shooting line and the shooters retrieve ball and move to serving line.

Easiest serves are those coming from behind and slightly to the side of the shooter, also ball must be on ground and in front of shooter Shooter should be facing sideways so he can see both the ball coming and the goal at which she will shoot. Next easiest are serves coming from the goal on the ground back to the shooter who is facing the goal; hardest serves are those coming across the field from either side.

If a larger goal is available, a parent as keeper (preferably a totally inept keeper) is lots of fun.

The youngest will be lousy servers and you will have to decide if it is “working” when you have them serve. If not simply change the activity.

One version of the setup: Line in front of goal about 15 yards out. First player in line has no ball. Second player in line pushes the ball from behind to in front of the first player so that the ball is rolling towards the goal. The first player catches up to the ball and takes a first time shot. First player retrieves ball and goes to end of line, second player moves to front of line … (You will have to instruct them about passing the ball slowly enough that the first player can reach it, but hard enough that it does get in front of him. One way to begin this is to have the first player facing the goal with his legs spread and the second player passes between the first players legs. That at least puts the ball between the player and the goal and as long as the pass is not too hard, the first player should be able to get a shot off.)

Other

1v1: Have the players find someone of comparable ability. Use two pairs. Have one pair serve as “goals” standing with their legs spread apart and the other two compete to score. Tell them the goals must be scored by shooting on the ground. After one minute goals and players switch.

If you have an odd number of pairs, use parents as “goals” .

Small sided game

Encourage the team with the ball (attackers) to spread out and to move to get open. Encourage the defenders (team without ball) to get between the ball and the goal (goal-side) (or between an attacker who is “up front” and the goal).

Don’t worry about the finer points of throw-ins, offsides, etc. Do prohibit sliding tackles, encourage the attackers to shoot, defenders to get back as soon as they lose the ball.

Defenders are everyone on the team that doesn’t have the ball. Attackers are everyone on the team that does have the ball. When no one has the ball, deciding whether you should act like a defender or an attacker is hard to determine, but the team that gets it right most often usually wins the game.

The scrimmage will likely look like a swarm around the ball. If the coach must engage in some tactical instruction, have one player play behind the swarm to collect any balls coming to him and play the ball forward to space in front of and to the side of the swarm. Later introduce players to the sides of the swarm to collect any balls to the side or passes from behind and then dribble forward and shoot or pass to the middle. Finally, add a player in front of the swarm to serve as a target. Now with 4 players outside the swarm, the remaining few players are just midfielders, the others are just in good supporting positions. Encourage the swarm to pass to any team-mate outside the swarm, yes a pass back is good and should be tolerated, even if it is a bit risky for K-3 s. The players outside the swarm should be rotated frequently.

It will take K’s all fall to get to the point where more than a couple will play outside the swarm. (except, for those who are really not playing at all and just standing with no clue as to what is going on, encourage those to get into the swarm. and get involved)

Do not relegate the only kid with a booming kick to stay back all the time. The point here is to learn and not to restrict the chances to learn in an effort to win or avoid an embarrassing loss.

Of course, there are lots of variations on all of these and you probably have your own favourite. With these guys silly games are not a bad idea. Just remember these little ones have trouble staying focussed on one activity for too long, so make lots of changes. If something isn’t working, change after a very short time, especially if you don’t have a clear way to make it easier or more fun to do.

 

 

 

 

  • Welcome: Name Tags/ Introduce yourself to the kids!

 

  • Gather– Have kids kick ball around the perimeter of the field, practice goal shots, or find a partner to pass to ‘til all kids arrive (5 mins)

 

  • Run- from one side of the field to the other and back

 

  • Stretch– circle up & do jumping jacks and other stretches (5 mins)

 

  • Drills- (Have them get their ball! I know they’re ready when they come back & put their foot on their ball. This is “Ready Position”. When I blow my whistle, teach them that’s when they freeze & put their foot on their ball- “Ready Position”. )

 

  1. (Goal Scoring) Divide into 2 groups. 1st group goes to the middle of the field facing one goal and the 2nd group goes to the middle of the field facing the other goal. SHOW THEM- how to dribble the ball, then score a goal. HAVE THEM DO IT NOW- Have them kick a goal, then get their ball, and go to the back of the line. (1 goal= 1 point) Start timer- see how many points they can score in 10 mins. (10 mins)

2.  Water Break (3 mins)

 

  1. (Ball throw-in)– Have the 2 groups line up on opposite sides of the field on the sideline and throw it down the side-line towards the goal. SHOW THEM- The proper way is to keep both feet on the ground, while throwing the ball over their head. (Google it if you need a video demonstration). The groups will be on opposite sides of the field by each goal, so they won’t be throwing at each other.

         HAVE THEM DO IT NOW- After they throw their ball, have them get their ball & go to the end of the line. When everyone’s done it twice, then line them all up on one side of the field and when you say, “On your mark, get set, Go!” they’ll all practice doing a “throw-in” as far as they can throw it! Let them see how far they can throw it, get their ball, and get back to line quickly! If you start to say “On your mark…” they’ll know they need to hurry back to get ready to throw it again. (10 mins)

 

  1. (Dribbling) Have them line up on one side of the field and kick their ball to the other side and back. Wait for everyone to get to the other side, then have them go back the other way (10 mins).

 

  1. Water Break (3 mins)
  1. Scrimmage- Line them up on the field. You can either line up in the middle of the field in a straight line across the field OR put them in their positions. 2 forwards & 1 defender. (Ages 3-5) 2 forwards & 2 defenders by the goal (Ages 6-7) Put the ball in the middle and blow the whistle for the start of the game. Teach them which goal is theirs to score into. (10 mins).

 

  1. Cheer- Blow whistle & yell, “Bring it in!” Have them circle up, put hands in, say, “1, 2, 3- SOCCER!” or have them yell their team name (ie- Coyotes and have them sound like a Coyote- 1, 2, 3- Ow ow awooo!). On the 2nd practice, they’ll get their t-shirts & this is a great time to come up with a team name!

 

**Modify for older age groups: Ages 8-13

**Practice #2 & #3- do the same outline, just different drills!

 

 

 

Other Games & Drills

 

  • 2 Cones (Dribbling)– 2 Line Relay. Have them start @ the 1st cone, then kick their ball down to the 2nd cone, around it, & back. Then next person goes until everyone has gone twice. Players sit down when they’ve gone twice. (Practice- Stopping ball and turning it around the cone.) Cones- 8-10 steps apart.

 

  • Square game (Dribbling)- game to see how many times you can get to the other side and back. When you cross each end- line of cones, it’s 1 point. Do it til you get to 10 points.

 

  • Red Light- Green Light (Ball Control)– Green light means they can dribble the soccer ball. Red light, then blow whistle- means stop with foot on top of ball. This allows them to learn to dribble,      stop the ball,      and control it.

 

  • Sharks and minnows– In the field area, have 2 people be sharks and the rest are minnows. The minnows get to dribble the ball, while the shark tries to kick their ball out of the square. When their ball is kicked out of the square, they bring the ball to the coach & turn into a shark also. Game is over when all of the sharks have kicked out the last minnow’s ball. The kids love this! Then, I pick 2 new sharks.
  • Lions and Tigers- (Attackers/ Defense) Divide group, so that ½ of the group gets a ball & the other ½ doesn’t. The goal is to try to take another person’s ball away from them & dribble it w/o getting it taken away. The Lions (Defenders) are trying to steal the ball and the Tigers (Attackers) are trying to keep their ball. After 1 minute, the player with the ball wins. Repeat 2 or 3 times. (It’s kind of like 1 v. 1 keepaway!)

 

  • Passing– (Demonstrate, then have them practice)
  1. Inside of foot (between the heel and ball of foot)- proper pass technique
  2. Outside of foot- proper pass technique
  3. Shooting the ball- kick with the laces of the cleats/ tennis shoes
  4. Scooping the ball into the air- get foot under the ball w/ the inside of the foot                            closest to the big toe.
  • All the body parts used in soccer:

 

  1. Heading the ball- ball hits at the hairline, not on the top of the head or the main                            part of the forehead.
  2. Chest trap- poke out chest and stomach and let ball hit chest, then fall straight                                     down to feet to be able to continue dribbling the ball.
  3. Cherry bombing the ball- practice holding the ball out & touch to the top of the                                     cleat,          then have them practice kicking the ball out of their hand as it sits on                                     the top of their cleat. Then have them throw the ball up a little bit above                                     their cleat and practice kicking the ball as it comes down.
  4. Trapping the ball- turn foot sideways and cushion the ball with the inside of                                     foot, so it slows and is left in front of you so you can step forward to pass it.

 

  • Partner pass– After you’ve taught proper passing techniques, have them trap the ball, then pass & see how many times they can pass it to their partner in 1 minute. **A PASS IS NO GOOD IF IT CAN’T BE RECEIVED BY THEIR TEAM- MATE. (Good pass is on the ground, within reach, not too hard, not too soft, when it is expected (not to someone not paying attention), pass in front of the player, not in back of them).

 

Now, get in a line & have the partners run as they’re passing down the field ‘til they get                   close to the goal, then shoot. Start the next partnership as soon as the 1st partners score                   their goal.

 

  • Keep away– 3 v. 3. 3 players on offense & 3 on defense. This helps them practice getting        “open” to receive the ball. The team that has the ball after 1 minute wins.

 

  • 1 v. 1 Goal Shooting– Use two pairs. Have one pair serve as “goals” standing with their legs spread apart and the other two are the “players” competing to score. Tell them the      goals must be scored by shooting on the ground in- between the other 2 people’s legs.      Each time it goes through, it’s a point! After one minute goals and players switch.

 

  • 2 passers and 1 defender. Passers pass to each other and defender tries to steal the ball. Take the ball down and shoot. If defender gets it- they get 1 pt. If passers keep it and      score- they get 1 pt.

 

  • Driving school– Use the inside of the field.
•   “This is Driving School & I’m your Instructor. I’m going to teach you how to drive but you must listen carefully & do exactly what I say.”•   Each player has a ball & must stay inside the cones.•   Coach uses a ball to demonstrate what each of the instructions means:”Go” – Start dribbling (“Keep the ball near your feet & look up while you dribble so you don’t run into someone”).

 

“Stop” – Put foot on top of ball to stop it

 

“Slow” – Dribble slow

 

“Speed Up” – Dribble faster but keep looking up & don’t “wreck”.

 

“Turn right” – Use the outside of the right foot to push the ball to the right & dribble

in that direction.

 

“Turn left” – Use the outside of the left foot to push the ball to the left & then dribble

in that direction.

 

“Pull back & go the other way” – Use the bottom of foot to pull the ball back

(i.e., flick it backward) & then turn around & go the other way.

 

For U-10 & up, include “Steparound” when the ball is stopped or going slow. Step over the

ball to the right and then kick with the outside of your left foot out to the left.

 

 

  • Shoulder Charge- Shoulder Tackle”, “Shielding”, “Strength on the Ball” (Ages 8 & up)

 

This Practice Game teaches bravery and aggressive play, that soccer is a physical game and to not be afraid of contact or being bumped or pushed, strength on the ball to maintain possession while dribbling, shielding the ball to maintain possession when challenged, a legal Shoulder Tackle, challenging for the ball to slow the attack and how to legally push a player off the ball. Soccer is a physical game and in real soccer games, it is critical for players to be able to challenge for the ball and also to be able to retain possession of the ball when they are dribbling. The opposing players will try to use a “Shoulder Tackle” to push your players off the ball when they are dribbling, so they can steal the ball or slow down your attack. Your players need to learn what is called “Strength on the Ball” so they aren’t easily pushed off the ball when dribbling. Young players often aren’t used to physical play, but the fact is that the more physical team will usually win, so you must teach your players how to be physical so they have a chance to be successful. At the very least, you don’t want them to fall apart and give up when their opponents are physical and aggressive. This game teaches defenders how to legally use their shoulder to push an opponent off the ball, which is called a “Shoulder Tackle” (and also called a “Shoulder Charge”) and it also teaches players how to avoid being pushed off the ball while dribbling (which is called “Strength on the Ball”). It will get your players used to contact, which is very important, and teach them to play more aggressively. Soccer is a physical game and by U8 the more physical teams will start to have an advantage. Most parents prefer the word “brave” to “aggressive”, so it might be better to talk about teaching players to be “brave”. If your players aren’t prepared and get pushed off the ball, they will get frustrated. This game teaches players how to shield the ball and to have “strength on the ball” so they can retain possession, and how to legally try to steal the ball from the opposing player who has the ball. As you can see from the Testimonials, it really works. I get lots of letters from coaches about how valuable this game is.

 

  1. Have partners put shoulder to shoulder, hip to hipSee which players can make the other one move. Tell them to keep their arms straight down by their side (they cannot raise their arm or push with it, just the shoulder). Also, they must stay straight up and cannot “dip” their shoulder (if they do, they will often be called for a foul). They can move their feet, bend their legs and use their hip so long as their shoulder is in contact with the opponent’s shoulder. (Read Shoulder Charge” in the Dictionary for more rules). Tell your players “You can’t let other players push you around”.

 

  1. Have the pairs walk toward the Finish Line (without a ball), pushing shoulder-to-shoulder, hip-to-hip. If some pairs don’t push, switch up the pairs. Encourage players and praise improvement. For some players physical play is not natural, but with praise & encouragement they will improve. Tell them to keep their feet apart and knees bent so they are difficult to push.

 

  1. Do the same thing while running

 

  1. Give one player in each pair a ball, line up all pairs on the Starting Line and have the players with the ball try to dribble to the Finish Line while the other player tries to kick the ball away or steal it. If the “off-the-ball” player touches the ball he gets one point; if he steals it he gets 2 points. Then, give the other players the ball and let them try to dribble from the Finish Line to the Starting line. Do this several times and switch up the pairs for variety.

 

 

 

**SoccerHelp.com!**

file:///Users/dnsglenn/Desktop/Soccer%202013/Soccer%20Drills%20-%20SoccerHelp.com.webarchive

 

 

Soccer games and drills for Ages 3- 5:

I have had a request about what to do with kindergarten kids. Here are things I’ve done that seem to work.

Rule 1: be nice and have fun.
Rule 2: if things aren’t working give it a minute then move on.
Rule 3: if more than one kid loses focus, change the activity!

Dribbling

Every player with a ball.

Rules

  • Every player must keep moving and not run into anyone else
  • When coach says “one” they must stop and put their right foot on the ball (never mind that most cannot yet tell right from left just tell the lefties to use their other right foot).

Ask what part of your foot you should use when dribbling, get lots of answers. Correct one is all parts (trick question). Show how to pull ball back with sole of foot. Ask them to try it after you say start. When they are dribbling around, say “ONE”; once they are all stopped, tell them that now when you say “TWO” they are to stop and sit on the ball. “START” , “TWO”, Now show some other dribbling technique, for instance cutting the ball across with the inside of the foot. “START”, “ONE”, Tell them to move faster and to keep their heads up. “START”, “TWO”. If they did go faster, they probably had some collisions. Ask them how to avoid them. (Right answer is just like cars on motorway, go slower in traffic, only speed up when no one is around and always pay attention to what the other drivers are doing.)

Tell them when you say “THREE” to stop and put their nose on the ball. “START”, “THREE”, “START”, encourage them to find space on the field, help them say “there’s space over here”, “now its over in the other corner”. etc. Do several of the stops and starts to get them a little silly and maybe introduce another dribbling move.

Try “FOUR” – elbow, “FIVE” -left ear, etc.

Sharks and minnows

Need a moderate space with boundaries (about the dimensions of one long kick for these guys). All but one player (the shark) has a ball. The shark tries to kick the minnows’ balls out of the area. First let the minnows retrieve their ball and continue, then the minnows become sharks after they lose their ball. Continue play until all the balls are gone. Retrieve the balls and repeat.

Use a few cones to make a 10 to 15 yard square. Have all players with ball inside area. Tell them to try and kick each other’s ball out, but to keep their ball in. If their ball is kicked out, they must sprint after it and bring it back inside as quickly as possible. Stop them, ask them to count how many times they can kick someone else’s ball out. Start up again. Stop and ask who had more than 2,4,…. Now ask them to count how many times their ball is kicked out. Start and stop again, forget to ask for total.

Another game is to give 1/2 the players balls and tell the others to take a ball away and try to keep it. Players with a ball after 1 minute win. Repeat 2 or 3 times.

Arrange them in pairs. If you have an odd number, have one play with you. Play 1v1 keepaway for 1 minute. Player in possession after 1 minute is winner. Rearrange the pairs and go again for a total of 3 or 4 times.

Passing

Have them find a partner, one ball per pair. This will take a little while so you might tell them to come back from the break with a partner and a ball before you dismiss them.

First have them pass the ball back and forth while standing about 3 yards apart. They will look hopeless.

Stop them and ask what part of foot to use for short accurate passes on the ground. (Answer is inside of foot, show them what you mean; that part of the foot between the heel and ball of foot.) Have them resume. Point out that a pass is no good if it can’t be received by their team-mate. Ask what that means (answers on ground, within reach, not to hard, not too soft, when it is expected, for example it does no good to pass to a team-mate’s back, or to one picking dandelions)

Stop them ask them how to receive the ball (answer: cushion the ball so it slows and is left in front of you so you can step forward to pass it, Don’t let them stop the ball under their foot, or so close that the ball is stuck between their feet and must be moved before it can be kicked, tell them the ball should be kept moving) Now you will also have to tell them to back up after they pass the ball or else, they will end up too close together. Resume

Stop and tell them to do two-touch passing (you probably will have to ask what Two-touch is and find a correct respondent). Resume

Stop. Tell them that you want to count the number of passes in a minute and to start on your command. Start and time for one minute. Ask each pair how many passes, repeat.

Tell them to do one-touch passing. Time them for one minute while they count. Offer praise, “that’s very good”, That’s better than I though a bunch of 6-year -olds would do”, etc.

Now tell them to pass and move after they pass. Tell them to keep track of their partner, to avoid the other players (It’s harder than it looks), and not to dribble (two- or three -touch).

If you have an even number break them up into equal groups. 2v2 or 3 v3 is good, but 4v4 is confusing and will need a good neutral player or two to work, if you have an odd number pair yourself, or an older sibling with the obviously weakest player.

If you do pairs, have them play keep-away for one minute.

Encourage the player without the ball to move to get open and the defenders to challenge for the ball and to deny passing lanes. Team with the ball after one minute wins. Go again. Go again. Keep reinforcing the idea of getting open on the attack (in a position where your team-mate with the ball can see you, where you are not too close, but close enough and where the other team can’t intercept the pass).

If you do 3v3, consider using a neutral player to help the team with the ball. Again, reinforce the need to move to get open. Point out what happens if you hold the ball too long before passing (you get ganged-up on). Keep such observations very brief and generally make them in the form of a question (to which you will likely get lots of wrong answers, just say “no, that’s not what I’m looking for” or “that’s it!” when you get the right answer) If the neutral player is reasonably talented, have them ask the players to get open whenever there is no good target. The neutral player needs to move to be a good receiving position all the time. The better the neutral player, the more players that can be involved. Tell the players with the ball to make the longest pass they are capable of to a team-mate who is open. (Not the longest kick, but the longest pass to the team-mate farthest away from the other team’s players; Same comments about passes as before, within reach, on ground, not too hard, not too soft).

Shooting

Players love to shoot and score. Almost anything that gets lots of shots in a short time is fine. With 6 or fewer, a simple line taking turns and retrieving the balls works fine. Have them stay out of the way of each others shots.

For more than 6, you need to keep the bystanders occupied in some way. Having them serve a ball to the shooter, then move to the shooting line and the shooters retrieve ball and move to serving line.

Easiest serves are those coming from behind and slightly to the side of the shooter, also ball must be on ground and in front of shooter Shooter should be facing sideways so he can see both the ball coming and the goal at which she will shoot. Next easiest are serves coming from the goal on the ground back to the shooter who is facing the goal; hardest serves are those coming across the field from either side.

If a larger goal is available, a parent as keeper (preferably a totally inept keeper) is lots of fun.

The youngest will be lousy servers and you will have to decide if it is “working” when you have them serve. If not simply change the activity.

One version of the setup: Line in front of goal about 15 yards out. First player in line has no ball. Second player in line pushes the ball from behind to in front of the first player so that the ball is rolling towards the goal. The first player catches up to the ball and takes a first time shot. First player retrieves ball and goes to end of line, second player moves to front of line … (You will have to instruct them about passing the ball slowly enough that the first player can reach it, but hard enough that it does get in front of him. One way to begin this is to have the first player facing the goal with his legs spread and the second player passes between the first players legs. That at least puts the ball between the player and the goal and as long as the pass is not too hard, the first player should be able to get a shot off.)

Other

1v1: Have the players find someone of comparable ability. Use two pairs. Have one pair serve as “goals” standing with their legs spread apart and the other two compete to score. Tell them the goals must be scored by shooting on the ground. After one minute goals and players switch.

If you have an odd number of pairs, use parents as “goals” .

Small sided game

Encourage the team with the ball (attackers) to spread out and to move to get open. Encourage the defenders (team without ball) to get between the ball and the goal (goal-side) (or between an attacker who is “up front” and the goal).

Don’t worry about the finer points of throw-ins, offsides, etc. Do prohibit sliding tackles, encourage the attackers to shoot, defenders to get back as soon as they lose the ball.

Defenders are everyone on the team that doesn’t have the ball. Attackers are everyone on the team that does have the ball. When no one has the ball, deciding whether you should act like a defender or an attacker is hard to determine, but the team that gets it right most often usually wins the game.

The scrimmage will likely look like a swarm around the ball. If the coach must engage in some tactical instruction, have one player play behind the swarm to collect any balls coming to him and play the ball forward to space in front of and to the side of the swarm. Later introduce players to the sides of the swarm to collect any balls to the side or passes from behind and then dribble forward and shoot or pass to the middle. Finally, add a player in front of the swarm to serve as a target. Now with 4 players outside the swarm, the remaining few players are just midfielders, the others are just in good supporting positions. Encourage the swarm to pass to any team-mate outside the swarm, yes a pass back is good and should be tolerated, even if it is a bit risky for K-3 s. The players outside the swarm should be rotated frequently.

It will take K’s all fall to get to the point where more than a couple will play outside the swarm. (except, for those who are really not playing at all and just standing with no clue as to what is going on, encourage those to get into the swarm. and get involved)

Do not relegate the only kid with a booming kick to stay back all the time. The point here is to learn and not to restrict the chances to learn in an effort to win or avoid an embarrassing loss.

Of course, there are lots of variations on all of these and you probably have your own favourite. With these guys silly games are not a bad idea. Just remember these little ones have trouble staying focussed on one activity for too long, so make lots of changes. If something isn’t working, change after a very short time, especially if you don’t have a clear way to make it easier or more fun to do.

 

SAMPLE PRACTICE:  6-9’s- week 1 Practice

 

Welcome– Name Tags/ Introduce yourself to the kids!

 

Gather– Let kids kick ball around on the field til all kids arrive

 

Stretch– circle up & do jumping jacks and other stretches

 

Run- from one side of the field to the other and back

 

Drills-

  1. (Practice scoring a goal) Divide into 2 groups. 1st group goes to the middle of the field facing one goal and the 2nd group goes to the middle of the field facing the other goal. Tell them they’re the red team and so they’re going to go to the goal with the red flag. Blue team goes to the goal with the blue flags and tries to score a goal. Have them kick a goal and then get their ball and go to the back of the line.

 

  1. (Practice throwing in the ball)- Have the 2 groups line up on opposite sides of the field on the sideline and throw it down the line. The groups will be on opposite sides of the field by each goal, so they won’t be throwing at each other.

 

  1. Have them line up on one side of the field and kick their ball to the other side and back.

 

  1. Grab a partner and pass to each other. Teach them to trap/ stop the ball, then pass it back.

 

  1. End with a cheer- circle up, put hands in, say “GO TEAM!” or have a team name

 

NEXT WEEK: Red light/ green light, lions and tigers, swamp game

6-9’s- week 2 Practice

 

Gather:

Let kids take 1 lap around the field- dribbling the ball

Partner kicks

Goal Shots

 

Run- from one side of the field to the other and back

 

Stretch– circle up & do jumping jacks and other stretches

 

Drills-

  1. Divide into 2 groups- (Practice ball handling) 1) Red Light, Green Light. Teach the kick-back. (Commands- red light, green light, kick back) Turn around when get to end of field. 2) Lions and Tiger. The Tiger tries to kick the Lions ball out. When the lion kicks your ball out, you go get it, come back in and then start kicking your ball around again. When the Tiger has kicked 5 out, then switch the Tiger. Then switch after 10 min.

 

  1. (Practice scoring a goal). 1st group goes to the middle of the field facing one goal and the 2nd group goes to the middle of the field facing the other goal. Have them kick a goal and then get their ball and go to the back of the line.

 

  1. Other Group (Practice ball handling and coordination)- Grab a partner and pass to each other. Teach them to trap/ stop the ball, then pass it back. Then switch after 10 min.

 

  1. Scrimmage

 

  1. End with a cheer- circle up, have them sit in a circle. Let them suggest team names, then secret vote. That’s our team name!

 

 

Soccer Drills: AGES 10-12 yr olds

and Free Videos of our Exclusive Soccer Drills

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Soccer drills should be fun, maximize activity, minimize lines, teach real soccer skills and prepare players for soccer matches. Soccer drills where players stand in line and do an activity one at a time are boring and not as effective as our drills and Practice Games. Most soccer drills allow players to practice at a slow speed because of a lack of competition and pressure. Our soccer drills are Practice Games that keep score and teach players to play fast and under pressure -your players will learn more at each practice compared to traditional line drills.Try our soccer drills or watch the free videos by clicking the link below and you will immediately see the difference and why our drills are better. Your players will start to improve within one or two practices and you will see amazing results after 5 or 6 practices.How We Rate Soccer Drills and Practice Games: The drills and games on SoccerHelp were selected from hundreds we have tested. They are the best. However, some are better than others. Our soccer drills are rated with 2, 3 or 4 star ratings, with 4-stars being the highest rating. Look for 4 asterisks ****. The very best say (Definitely try this). We invented most of the soccer drills and games on SoccerHelp, so they are original, copyrighted, and only found on SoccerHelp.What Coaches Say about Our Training Program:  700 Testimonials     Success Stories

Free Soccer Training Videos – Soccer Drills, Skills & Tactics Videos

Soccer Drills and Practice Games:

  1. “Dribble Across A Square” (U-8 & up) * * * * (Definitely try this) This soccer drill is the best way to teach dribbling and is an excellent warm-up. Playing this in a small square teaches “Control Dribbling“, and making the square larger will teach players how to “Breakaway” (how to look for Open Space, accelerate into it, and Speed Dribble). I recommend playing it as a warm-up to start every practice. It will quickly improve your player’s dribbling, shielding, turning, recognition of open space, acceleration and ability to stop and confidence with the ball. They will learn to dribble while looking up and will learn “naturally” how to dribble with both feet (you won’t have to use artificial ways to try to teach them). It also helps children’s brains learn to process a lot of activity, to use peripheral vision, and to make correct, instinctive decisions and maintain composure when under pressure and in heavy traffic. It is self-teaching and the coach can help the players by giving them “tips” that allow them to improve. You will see definite results within 3 practices, the set-up is easy and it is 100% onball. IMPORTANT: Tell your players that this game is part of their “Warming Up” — otherwise they may resist it at first (because at first it isn’t easy for some players) and they might later get tired of it. BUT, there is no substitute for this game. You are doing your players a favor by having them play it. It will improve their instinctive reactions and dribbling skills in a way no other game can. There is no way dribbling thru cones can teach what this game teaches. Once your players see that it is causing them to improve, they won’t complain about it and they will consider it part of “Warming Up”. Be sure to have the players keep score so it is “Game-Realistic” and you can monitor progress, and give “tips” at the end of each Game about how they can improve“We played the Dribble Across a Square and Dribble Around the Cone and Pass Relay Race Practice Games at every practice, and the results were phenomenal.” Coach Greg, U9 Coach and Premium Member See “Warm Up Practice Games
  1. “Dribble Around Cone & Pass Relay Race” (U-8 and older) * * * * (Definitely try this) This is my favorite soccer drill for players U8 and older – it will teach your players to play faster, which is HUGELY important. It teaches Aggressive Receiving, passing while running and under pressure, speed dribbling, turning, the importance of first-touch, one-touch control, and teaches receivers to move to the ball and how to receive the ball at game speed and while under pressure. This game is self-teaching and the coach can help the players by giving them “tips” that allow them to improve. Perhaps the most important thing this game can teach is “Aggressive Receiving”. You can read about the benefits of “Aggressive Receiving” on the bottom of the instructions for this game on SoccerHelp. You will see fast results, the set-up is easy and every player is either a dribbler/passer or a receiver.
  1. “Strength on the Ball, Aggressive Play & Bravery Game” * * * * This soccer drill is a simple, easy, and fast way to teach players to be strong on the ball (so they don’t get pushed around and can retain possession) and ALSO how to legally use their shoulder to push opponents off the ball to steal it. This really works and quickly makes a difference. It teaches bravery and aggressive play, that soccer is a physical game and to not be afraid of contact or being bumped or pushed, strength on the ball to maintain possession while dribbling, shielding the ball to maintain possession when challenged, a legal Shoulder Tackle, challenging for the ball to slow the attack and how to legally push a player off the ball. It is for U6 to Adult. You can read Testimonials on the game by coaches of U10, U12, U14 and U16. Here are 3 — “The Shoulder Tackling game is working beyond belief. Some of my timid girls are now amongst the toughest on the team.” Mark, U1OG, and “The other team was bigger and trying to play very aggressively against us, but we have been playing the Strength on the Ball game since the beginning of the season, and, although they really tried, the other team could not push my boys around.” Coach Stephanie, U10 Boys, and “I LOVE the “Shoulder Tackle & Strength on the Ball” drill – it has HUGE benefits.” Coach Tony, U16G
  1. “Driving School” (U-6 to U-10) * * * * This soccer drill teaches control dribbling, using the bottom of foot to stop the ball, pullbacks, and using outside of right foot and left foot. Easy set-up and 100% onball.
  1. “Tick Tock” (aka “The Foundation”) (All ages) * * * * This is a very simple game that practices fast feet and ball control using inside-of-feet. Very easy set-up and 100% onball.
  1. “Small Sided Scrimmage Without A Goalie” (U-8 & Up)* * * * This is a better way for most teams to scrimmage. Rec teams should only scrimmage for about 10 minutes of each hour they practice. This game is a good way to evaluate players – you will be able to quickly tell a lot about a player’s skills, natural abilities, and where they prefer to play. This game is better than a regular scrimmage in 2 ways: (1). All players learn to defend and play tough defense and block shots, and not rely on the Goalie, and (2). To score, they must work the ball close to the goal and not take long shots, so control, dribbling, passing, and movement off the ball in the Attacking Third are encouraged. This game has the disadvantage of a low ball per player ratio.
  1. “Chips/Lofted Passes Game” (U-10 & up) * * * * An effective way to practice “lofted passes with backspin”. Every player should know how to “loft” the ball for shots, for long “over-the-top” passes & as a way to “clear” the ball. Easy set-up, lots of touches and a game format. 50% onball.
  1. “Hit The Coach” (U-4 and U-6) * * * * (Definitely try this) My favorite soccer drill that is a game for U-4 and U-6 players. It’s easy, fun and the kids love it. 100% onball. This games teaches tremendous skills – dribbling, kicking the ball while running, looking up while dribbling and kicking the ball, getting used to contact (a very important thing for young players – because they will all be chasing the coach, they will be close together and bumping each other and it will be chaotic, which gets them used to the mental stimulus of games). This game is self-teaching and they learn by playing the game. Dribbling and kicking the ball in a crowd while looking up isn’t easy and this is a fun way to learn those skills. Watch a Video of the “Hit the Coach” Practice Game.
  1. “Throw-Ins Teaching Game” (U-8 & up) * * * (Try this) This soccer drill is a quick and effective way to teach or practice throw-ins. If you are a beginning coach, review “How to Teach Throw-Ins” at “Skills” on SoccerHelp.com. This isn’t great fun, but it is quick and effective. 50% onball.
  1. “Kick A Crossed Ball Game” (U-8 & up) * * * * A “crossed ball” is a ball coming from the side. This game is an effective, efficient way to practice timing the run and how to kick a crossed ball, which is not an easy thing to do. It will teach the player to take a short backswing, to keep his head down, eyes on the ball, and to start out by blocking the ball using the inside of the foot.
  1. “Monster Invasion” (Dribbling & concept of a field, U-4 and U-6) * * * * (Definitely try this) This is a simple, always fun game for U-4 and U-6. Every player has a ball and everyone, including the coach, has fun. 100% onball.

Coaching Tips Worth 2 Goals Per Game (Definitely try this) Click the link to read Testimonials from coaches and to see tips. Here are a few Testimonials — “Coaching Rule No. 1 really is worth a couple goals a game. Super easy to teach, and super easy to coach from the sidelines.” Coach Bob, U10 and “For about 2 weeks, we worked on nothing other than soccer Coaching Rules 1 – 3. We won our next 5 games scoring 20 goals and giving up none, we won 6 – 0, 3 – 0, 4 – 0, 3 – 0 and 4 – 0.” Coach Tony, U16 and “I taught my players Coaching Rule No. 3 from Premium and the results were immediately phenomenal!” Coach Charlie, U10


SoccerHelp Premium contains over 70 “Third Generation” Soccer Drills that are Practice Games, including 29 soccer drills for U4 and U6 (age 3, 4 and 5), 45 soccer drills for U8 (age 6 and 7), 52 soccer drills for U10 (age 8 and 9) and 50 soccer drills for U12 (age 10 and 11). Basic versions of nine of those practice games are found belowSoccerHelp Practice Games are superior to soccer drills in 15 ways, as listed below. Our Practice Games are fun and really work. Your team will learn by simply playing the games and you will achieve more in less time. Practice attendance will improve, players will have more enthusiasm and your team will play better and win more games. Our games have been tested by thousands of coaches, including Rec coaches, select and tournament team coaches, adult team coaches, beginning coaches, very experienced coaches, coaches who never played soccer and coaches who played college and professional soccer. In simple terms, we have invented a better “mousetrap”. It is a unique, innovative program that quickly achieves results. Our Premium members get more enjoyment from coaching and their players learn more and have more fun. If you have any doubts, read theTestimonials or Coaches CommentsWith a money back guarantee, there is no risk to trying it. If you aren’t completely satisfied, just send us an e-mail during the first 10 days and we will give you a full refund with no questions asked. Premium now contains over 1,500 pages and 5,000 internal links. Over 15,000 coaches have subscribed to Premium.

From www.soccerhelp.com
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+David Huddleston

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